As the largest carrier based in Hawaii, Hawaiian Airlines (HA) serves about 25 destinations within the state, elsewhere in the United States, and in Australia, China, Japan, New Zealand, South Korea and the South Pacific. The airline's fleet includes aircraft with two-cabin configuration (First Class and Business Class). It also operates a regional subsidiary, ʻOhana by Hawaiian, that flies planes configured with only an Economy Class cabin. Hawaiian Airlines operates two hubs: Honolulu International Airport (HNL) and Kahului Airport (OGG).
Hawaiian Airlines (HA) is the premiere airline for travel to the Hawaiian Islands. Its origins date back to 1929 when it was founded as Inter-Island Airways Ltd with service between Honolulu, Maui, and the Big Island of Hawaii. Today Hawaiian's route structure provides Hawaiian style service between the Hawaiian islands plus service to North America, Asia, and the South Pacific. Daniel K. Inouye International Airport (HNL) in Honolulu serves as the airline's headquarters and main hub. It also has a large hub at Kahului Airport (OGG) on Maui. Hawaiian Airlines mainline fleet consists of Airbus A321neo's, A330-200's, Boeing 717-200's, and 767-300's. The Airbus A330-200 aircraft have recently been updated with lie flat beds in their Premium Cabins. The lie flat bed seats have been designed with aspects from Hawaii's environment such as curves, earth tone colors, and natural wood. The Boeing aircraft feature two class service. ATR 42-500 aircraft are used on some inter-island flights with Hawaiian Airlines' connector airline 'Ohana. Hawaiian Airlines has an extended network with codeshare flights on several airlines such as Air China (CA), China Airlines (CI), JAL (JL), JetBlue (B6), and Korean Air (KE).
On 25 August 1919, the company used DH.16s to pioneer a regular service from Hounslow Heath Aerodrome to Le Bourget, the first regular international service in the world. The airline soon gained a reputation for reliability, despite problems with bad weather, and began to attract European competition. In November 1919, it won the first British civil airmail contract. Six Royal Air Force Airco DH.9A aircraft were lent to the company, to operate the airmail service between Hawkinge and Cologne. In 1920, they were returned to the Royal Air Force.[7]
To replace its retired DC-8s and L-1011s, Hawaiian Airlines leased six DC-10s from American Airlines, who continued to provide maintenance on the aircraft. An agreement with American also included participation in American's SABRE reservation system and participation in American Airlines' AAdvantage frequent flyer program.[25] The DC-10s were subsequently retired between 2002 and 2003.[10] The company replaced these leased DC-10s with 14 leased Boeing 767 aircraft during a fleet modernization program that also replaced its DC-9s with new Boeing 717 aircraft. The Boeing aircraft featured an updated rendition of the company's "Pualani" tail art, which had appeared on its Douglas aircraft since the 1970s.

In recognition of the essential national economic role of a healthy aviation system, Congress authorized partial compensation of up to $5 billion in cash subject to review by the U.S. Department of Transportation and up to $10 billion in loan guarantees subject to review by a newly created Air Transportation Stabilization Board (ATSB). The applications to DOT for reimbursements were subjected to rigorous multi-year reviews not only by DOT program personnel but also by the Government Accountability Office[46] and the DOT Inspector General.[47][48]

Destruction of flora on the berm by the use of herbicides, excessive pedestrian or vehicle traffic, or disruption to fresh water flows may lead to erosion of the berm and dunes. While the destruction of flora may be a gradual process that is imperceptible to regular beach users, it often becomes immediately apparent after storms associated with high winds and freak wave events that can rapidly move large volumes of exposed and unstable sand, depositing them further inland, or carrying them out into the permanent water forming offshore bars, lagoons or increasing the area of the beach exposed at low tide. Large and rapid movements of exposed sand can bury and smother flora in adjacent areas, aggravating the loss of habitat for fauna, and enlarging the area of instability. If there is an adequate supply of sand, and weather conditions do not allow vegetation to recover and stabilize the sediment, wind-blown sand can continue to advance, engulfing and permanently altering downwind landscapes.
I’ve talked with a lot of pilots over the years, both men and women who fly for major carriers like American and British Airways. For the most part, they are very nice people. But, when they tell us to do something, we have to obey because a pilot's word is law on a plane. The good news is, their biggest concern is for our safety. In that spirit, here's a list things passengers should never do. Don't... Continue reading
Beaches are changed in shape chiefly by the movement of water and wind. Any weather event that is associated with turbid or fast flowing water, or high winds will erode exposed beaches. Longshore currents will tend to replenish beach sediments and repair storm damage. Tidal waterways generally change the shape of their adjacent beaches by small degrees with every tidal cycle. Over time these changes can become substantial leading to significant changes in the size and location of the beach.
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