Like Imperial Airways, Air France and KLM's early growth depended heavily on the needs to service links with far-flung colonial possessions (North Africa and Indochina for the French and the East Indies for the Dutch). France began an air mail service to Morocco in 1919 that was bought out in 1927, renamed AĆ©ropostale, and injected with capital to become a major international carrier. In 1933, AĆ©ropostale went bankrupt, was nationalized and merged into Air France.


Hawaiian began acquiring Boeing 717 aircraft for operation on the Neighbor Island network in February 2001.[67] On June 4, 2008, the airline announced that it had agreed to lease an additional four 717 airplanes to meet demand due to the shutdown of Aloha Airlines' passenger operations and the closing of ATA Airlines, with deliveries between September and the end of 2008.[68]
If you know anything about the history of airline baggage fees, you'll remember the year 2008. That's when American Airlines rocked the air travel industry by charging for a first checked-bag. Sure, the U.S. Travel Association may demand a free bag for every passenger, but it'll never happen - airlines in the U.S. alone took in more than $3 billion in bag fees last year. They'd be crazy to give ... Continue reading
Often the companies combine IT operations, or purchase fuel and aircraft as a bloc to achieve higher bargaining power. However, the alliances have been most successful at purchasing invisible supplies and services, such as fuel. Airlines usually prefer to purchase items visible to their passengers to differentiate themselves from local competitors. If an airline's main domestic competitor flies Boeing airliners, then the airline may prefer to use Airbus aircraft regardless of what the rest of the alliance chooses.
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